Storm Water

Storm water is any water that originates from a storm or precipitation, whether it be rain, snow, sleet, hail, or ice. Storm water can also relate to snow or ice melt, or to flooding following torrential rain events. Storm water often percolates into the ground where it recharges groundwater aquifers. This water, prior to percolation or treatment, contains minerals, dirt, grit, grime, oil and other contaminants, so sewer systems aim to capture this water and through use of collections systems either treat it directly or distribute it to a local water way.

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Dec 28 2000
Aquatic Plant Nutrients The aquatic plant nutrients, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compounds, are of potential concern in urban stormwater runoff…
Dec 28 2000
The state of California is recognized as being among the leaders in the United States in developing consensus approaches for implementing the federal…
Dec 28 2000
The amended Clean Water Act, reauthorized by Congress in 1987, mandated that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency develop a National Pollutant…
Dec 28 2000
In the first large-scale application of its kind, the City of Fillmore, in Ventura County, California, expanded its treated wastewater disposal…
Dec 28 2000
Artificial recharge of groundwater has become a necessity in Orange County, California, where natural recharge is insufficient to satisfy water…
Dec 28 2000
Wastewater management practices at the more than 15,000 publicly-owned treatment facilities in the United States historically have focused on…
Dec 28 2000
The recovery of valuable materials or separation of hazardous materials from wastewater flows can sometimes be accomplished with evaporation…
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