Nov 21, 2018

Sewer Rates Could Be Rising in Ohio

Neighbor in Oregon, Ohio, could see a 22% increase over three years in water and sewer rates

Neighbor in Oregon, Ohio, could see a 22% increase over three years in water and sewer rates
Neighbor in Oregon, Ohio, could see a 22% increase over three years in water and sewer rates.

In Ohio, the Oregon City Council has moved the issue of water and sewer rates to their regular meeting for an official vote.

According to WTOL, neighbors in Oregon would see a 22% increase over three years. The typical water and sewer customer’s bill would increase by about $12 a month or $36 a quarter by 2021.

According to city leaders, they have not raised rates like this in about a decade. It is now needed because of inflations, treatment for Microsystin, aging infrastructure and in order to repair water and sewer lines in their system.

Administrators fear not increasing water and sewer rates could cost the city more in the future, according to WTOL. Some residents and council member just want what is best for the city.

“I think it’s a good thing because we don’t want to get into the position that Toledo is in and have trouble with our water,” said Mary Ramirez, an Oregon resident, to WTOL. “So, if they want to spend the money then I am for it 100%.”

However, some people want to keep the water and sewer rates down if possible.

“I don’t want to take and say what we’ve got, it’s good enough now,” said Kathleen Pollauf, Oregon City Council member and chair of the water and wastewater committee, to WTOL. “I want to keep going and at the same time keep the costs as low as possible.”

According to city leaders, Oregon residents have some of the lowest sewer and water rates in the state. Even after the three-year proposed rate increases, they would continue to have some of the cheapest water rates in northwest Ohio.

The council will discuss water and sewer rates at their regular meeting on Nov. 26., where they could vote on an increase. The city currently serves 7,500 customers spread out over 28 sq miles.

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