Nov 19, 2018

California Recycled Water Pipeline Extension Planned

A California pipeline currently provides water for agricultural use and is used for water treated from the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts’ wastewater treatment plant

A California pipeline currently provides water for agricultural use and is used for water treated from the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts’ wastewater treatment plant
A California pipeline currently provides water for agricultural use and is used for water treated from the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts’ wastewater treatment plant.

In California, there is a proposal to extend a pipeline for carrying recycled water for two miles. According to The Antelope Valley Press, the pipeline provides water for agricultural use and also is used for water treated from the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts’ wastewater treatment plant.

The project has received support from the Antelope Valley State Water Contractors Association, according to The Antelope Valley Press. The board agreed to process with an application for the project to be included in the Antelope Valley Integrated Regional Water Plant project list. According to The Antelope Valley Press, inclusion in the list would allow the proposal to qualify for grant funding.

The line would tap into a recycled water line, creating an extension where the line passes through farmland.

“The would make recycled water available for agricultural use,” said Peter Thompson II, assistant general manager said to The Antelope Valley Press. “It hits more on an overall, Antelope Valley-wide water management benefit.”

According to The Antelope Valley Press, benefits include providing timely use for recycled water and potentially reducing the use of groundwater in the area. The groundwater basin has been depleted and is now subject to pumping restrictions through a court settlement. According to Thompson, in areas that are more depleted lessening use of groundwater may help refill the aquifer faster.

“The impact it can create is huge, just with two miles,” Commission Marco Henriques said to The Antelope Valley Press.

Farmer John Calandri called the project “a lifeline” for agriculture by providing an avenue for it to continue providing food and jobs. According to Calandri, tertiary-treated water open the way for organic farming.

Ray Tremblay, head of facilities planning for the districts, said the Los Angeles County Sanitation District have invested heavily in modern wastewater treatment plant and storage with intent the recycled water be available for use.

“The goal and priority of our board has been to supply this water to public agencies to meet the recycled water demands for the Valley,” he said to The Antelope Valley Press. “This would be a very good use of reclaimed water.”

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