'Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns' Grants Available to Improve Chesapeake Bay

Feb. 8, 2012

Grants will award more than $400,000 in 2012

The Chesapeake Bay Trust, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the state of Maryland unveiled an expanded "Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns" grant initiative to help cities and towns in the Chesapeake Bay watershed accelerate greening efforts that improve watershed protection, community livability and economic vitality. Building on the success of the initial round of grants, this public-private partnership will award more than $400,000 in 2012, double the funding from 2011.

“To meet tomorrow’s challenges, we need to apply cost-effective solutions for improving the health of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the economy of our communities,” said EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. “Green streets and green infrastructure are investments that create jobs and save money while also providing multiple environmental and quality of life benefits. By helping towns accelerate their local greening efforts, we’re moving ahead in creating an America built to last.”

The grant program is open to local governments and non-profit organizations in urban and suburban watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland, Washington, D.C., Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia who are interested in pursuing green streets, green infrastructure and green jobs as part of their community or watershed planning.

Grant assistance up to $35,000 is available for infrastructure project planning and design and up to $100,000 for implementation and construction. The strongest proposals will incorporate innovative green infrastructure and best management practices that maximize cost-effectiveness. Projects selected will enhance sustainable watershed protection and green infrastructure storm water management through low impact development practices, renewable energy use, local livability and green job creation.

“Many small to mid-sized communities around the Chesapeake Bay watershed are looking for ways to boost local economies while also protecting water resources and expand greening efforts,” said Allen Hance, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “Building green streets and urban green infrastructure projects marry three important issues that these towns face: jobs, livability and the environment.”

Source: EPA

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