Feb 26, 2019

Henry Pratt Co. Employees Return To Work

The Aurora Police Department has released the 911 call from after the Henry Pratt Co. shooting as well as the officers’ names who were injured, as Henry Pratt employees return to work

The Aurora Police Department have released the 911 call from after the Henry Pratt Co. shooting as well as the officers’ names who were injured, as Henry Pratt employees return to work
The Aurora Police Department have released the 911 call from after the Henry Pratt Co. shooting as well as the officers’ names who were injured, as Henry Pratt employees return to work.

On Monday, Feb. 25, employees were back on the job at Henry Pratt Co., just 10 days after five people were killed in a mass shooting at the plant.

According to the Chicago Tribune, a crew of counselors, including comfort dogs were seen leaving the building to head down toward the factory.

The company announced over the weekend that it created the Aurora/Pratt Survivor’s Fund through the National Compassion Fund, with support from GoFundMe and Mueller Water Products, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Mueller Water Products will contribute to the fund and cover all administrative fees. More information on the fund can be found on the website here.

The Aurora Police Department has also released the 911 call from after the shooting at the Henry Pratt Co. building in Aurora, Ill.

 

According to ABC 7, the call is as follows:

911 dispatcher: "If you hear anything or see anything, I want you to tell me, OK?"

Caller: "OK, I'm hiding in a completely separate room now. I can't even see anything or hear anything. I'm not taking any chances here."

911 dispatcher: "Can you hear anything?"

Caller: "No."

911 dispatcher: "I have officers there." Pause. "No, it is not secure. This guy is not in custody. Nobody moves any further, OK?"

Caller: "OK."

911 dispatcher: "Do not give him a target. Nobody moves."

 

According to ABC 7, the department said it released the audio to be transparent and honor the first responders who helped save lives.

Six Aurora police officers were hurt while responding to the shooting. According to ABC 7, they’re all doing okay.

"I'm very proud of our officers. We were following our training. We learned from other mass shootings that you can't sit outside and wait for the gunman to come out. By then it's too late," said Sgt. Bill Rowley, spokesman for the Aurora police.

In a Facebook post on Monday, the department released the officers’ names and photos.

According to the Chicago Tribune, the most senior of six police officers injured in the shooting had 30 years of service with the department. Five of the officers had injuries related to gunfire, while the sixth received what police have described as a “minor injury”. According to the Chicago Tribune, four of the officers injured by gunfire were out of the hospital by Feb. 17. The police said on Thursday, Feb. 21, that the fifth officer was home.

The injured officers, according to the Chicago Tribune, are:

  • James Zegar, who has 25 years of service with the Aurora Police Department. Zegar was previously shot while working undercover in 2002, when a bullet grazed his head during an exchange of gunfire with a man later sentenced to 18 years in prison for attempted murder.

  • John Cebulski, who has 30 years of service with the Aurora Police Department. Cebulski was previously part of a unit tasked with investigating domestic-related issues, police Sgt. Bill Rowley said, and court records show the gunman about 10 years ago asked Cebulski to investigate claims of identity theft against the gunman’s ex-girlfriend.

  • Marco Gomez, who has 13 years of service with the Aurora Police Department.

  • Reynaldo Rivera, who has 24 years of service with the Aurora Police Department.

  • Adam Miller, who has just under four years of service with the Aurora Police Department.

  • Diego Avila, who has two years of service with the Aurora Police Department. Aurora police have previously said an officer with two years of service received a “minor injury” unrelated to gunfire while responding to the shooting.

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