Doe Run Peru Celebrates Sewage Water Treatment Plant Opening
Source: 
The Doe Run Company

On March 21, The Doe Run Co.'s subsidiary, Doe Run Peru, marked the opening of the new Huaymanta Sewage Water Treatment Plant, which will reduce contamination to the Yauli River, a tributary of the Mantaro River in Peru. Pursuant to its environmental operating agreement (PAMA), Doe Run Peru has committed more than $7 million to the total Sewage Water Treatment Project. The Huaymanta plant commenced operations last week and will treat sewage waters from the homes of up to 10,000 people, between local Doe Run employees and their families, living in the residential areas surrounding La Oroya, Peru.
“This project will improve the quality of life for thousands by reducing solid domestic waste contamination in the area’s main water source. This demonstrates the commitment of Doe Run Peru to the sustainable development of the region and the improvement of the quality of life for its citizens. In the future, we hope the water treatment expansion project can be extended to other local communities,” said Dr. Juan Carlos Huyhua, general manager of Doe Run Peru. “In addition to this sewage treatment project, we are also supporting the feasibility study for a project to improve and expand the drinking water and drainage systems for La Oroya, by means of a cooperation agreement with the Regional Government of Junin.”
Built with modern German technology that uses biodiscs, the Huaymanta Sewage Water Treatment Plant has the capacity to treat 32 liters of water per second.
The opening of the plant in Huaymanta represents the first of three plants that make up the Residual Water Treatment Project. The two remaining plants are scheduled for completion at the end of this year and will treat water from Doe Run Peru’s housing installations and metallurgical complex. The work is further evidence of Doe Run Peru’s commitment to projects set forth in the PAMA. Company officials expect that all liquid effluents will be under the permissible limits required by Peruvian environmental regulations by the end of 2006.

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