Mar 19, 2019

Iowa Water Plant Shutdown

A water plant in Hamburg, Iowa, has been forced to shut down due to flooding

A water plant in Hamburg, Iowa, has been forced to shut down due to flooding
A water plant in Hamburg, Iowa, has been forced to shut down due to flooding

In Hamburg, Iowa, the city’s water plant has fallen victim of one of the floods of 2019.

According to KMA News, city officials were forced to shut the plant down after flood waters spread into the community. Fremont County Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Crecelius said problems developed when water overtopped the famed "Ditch 6" levee– a focal point of the 2011 flooding.

According to KMA News, Hamburg schools are closed due to the flooding situation and the water plant's shutdown. Marnie Simons Elementary School remains open as a shelter for residents evacuated due to the flooding.

"They have the Hescos up to prevent water from getting further into town," Crecelius said to KMA News. "There is water into the south end of town at this point in time. At last report from the city of Hamburg, there was water flowing over the floodgate that they put on the bridge there at the Ditch 6 levee. They also had water coming in around the facilities on the south end of town.”

He added that they have everybody evacuated on the south end of town. We are just waiting to see what happens with the water, as far as the town goes, Crecelius said.

According to KMA News, city officials are asking residents not to flush their toilets, and express that the city may run out of water within 24 hours. Crecelius said he hopes to secure a tanker truck for Grape Community Hospital, and to secure water pallets for residents. Officials are also monitoring developments in Thurman, which was evacuated Sunday morning after flood waters made its way closer to the community.

Another issue is that all of the county roads have closed due to flooding have remained closed. Crecelius said motorists are either driving around the barricades at that location, or removing them– running the risk of driving into water.

"We have the Randolph road, that people are tearing the barricade down, and driving right on through," Crecelius said to KMA News. "They don't realize, or can't comprehend, that that road has been compromised, and is falling apart at the edges. You could be falling apart there, and we could be trying to rescue you, because you're in the river."

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