Yes or No to Fluoridation?
Neda Simeonova

Recently, a coalition of dental health groups launched new efforts to increase awareness of fluoridation of municipal water supplies in the U.S., according to Kansas.com.

Adding fluoride to drinking water is a simple process; however, cities such as Wichita continue to reject fluoridation efforts. The Wichita City Council last considered the process in 1999, but the proposal was rejected under complaints that fluoridation would amount to involuntary medical treatment, the report said.

Wichita is not alone. In early November, Amesbury, Mass., residents also voted to eliminate the city’s fluoridation program, according to Boston.com. The program was discontinued because the powdered sodium fluoride was clogging filters at the city’s water plant. Additionally, there were growing concerns about the inability to measure the amount of fluoride officials were adding to the drinking water, according to the report.

The decision to add fluoride to drinking water is generally a local municipal decision. Water & Wastes Digest would like to learn your opinion about this issue. Does your facility add fluoride to drinking water? E-mail us your comments at wwdeditor@sgcmail.com.

 

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