New Technology use Computer Modeling to Simulate Treatment

Lyonnaise des Eaux and United Water have developed a new technology for the U.S. water industry. The Virtual Plant is a new computer modeling application being applied for the first time to model and simulate the entire water treatment cycle.

The Virtual Plant is a computer modeling program that generates three-dimensional images of interacting substances (i.e. water and a disinfectant). With Virtual Plant technology, a full-scale plant operation can be reproduced on a computer so that plant designers can see how changes in water flow or water quality will affect the water treatment process. While design projects usually require a three to six month study at very high costs, this evaluation can now be accomplished in only a matter of days at a fraction of the cost.

Overall, Virtual Plant in the water treatment cycle replaces long and expensive studies; provides faster, more accurate results than existing physical models; guarantees maximum efficiency of the applied treatment process; and allows for more innovative and adaptable designs.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the utility industry will need to invest an estimated $36 billion over the next twenty years to upgrade water treatment facilities and comply with new safe drinking water regulations starting 2001. The Virtual Plant solution will help utilities meet the new requirements as well as achieving up to an estimated 40 percent savings in plant development and operation costs, enhancing water quality and providing greater process reliability.

In the U.S., United Water will be utilizing the Virtual Plant approach for the first time to design a $7 million upgrade of its Haworth Plant. The renovation will enable the plant to remain in compliance with the more stringent 2001 Safe Drinking Water Act rules.

The benefits of upgrading the Haworth Plant will be immediately passed on to over 750,000 people who depend on the plant for their water supply.

SOURCE: PR Newswire

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