Environmental Law Conference to Focus on Terrorist Threats to the Environment
Source: 
American Bar Association

Are America's air, water and energy infrastructures vulnerable to terrorist attack? Can we improve responses to terrorism to protect public health and swiftly restore public order and services? How should we pay to clean up environmental contamination caused by terrorist attacks?
 
These are among the questions to be addressed at the American Bar Association 30th National Spring Conference on the Environment. The meeting, to take place in Washington, D.C., on April 12, will bring together lawyers from the private and public sectors, public health experts, government regulators, and other interested parties to discuss lessons learned and issues raised by the September 11 terrorist attacks.
 
An interdisciplinary faculty including experts on biological weapons, first responders like local fire officials, and tort reform advocates will conduct sessions including
 
* Preparing for Terrorism, focusing on concrete measures that will help prevent attacks on nuclear reactors, electric utilities and water systems.
 
* Responding to Terrorism, including the possible need for new legal mechanisms to protect and preserve the environment.
 
* Financing and Clean-up, exploring the challenges faced by insurers, government and business.
 
* Future Torts, discussing the ways in which the events of Sept. 11 may have changed our concept of what is foreseeable, and thus, of future liability. Stephen Saltzburg, Law Professor, George Washington University National Law Center and Adjunct Professor at the University Virginia law school will be a panelist.
 
The Opening Keynote address will be given by Lucy G. Clark, Associate Legal Counsel, Office of Homeland Security.
 
 
The ABA National Spring Conference on the Environment will take place Friday, April 12, at the American University Washington College of Law.
 
To register, visit the website at www.abanet.org/publicserv/environmental or 202-662-1694.

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