What Screens in Vegas…

The City of North Las Vegas’s field facility is a membrane bioreactor (MBR) plant that was brand new when Huber’s rotary fine screens were implemented as part of its water treatment and reclamation process. The facility is “smart,” using a level of technology at which few large plants operate and employing sophisticated security that even includes a laser perimeter. The technology enables constant processing, with 14 of its daily operational hours unmanned on site. Huber’s advanced fine screening technology plays a key role in this impressive and innovative technological lineup.

Slimming Down, Shaping Up

The Oostburg Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) in Oostburg, Wis., found the Huber’s Rotamat RoK4 vertical fine screen when seeking out a new head works screening solution. The facility’s engineers had doubted that a solution existed that could meet their requirements and limitations.

Separated Out

In 2000, the Spanish Fork (Utah) Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) was looking for screening technology that would upgrade its present bar screen and rake system. Too many contaminants were making their way into the channel flow and causing problems with manpower consumption, end-product quality and EPA limits.

Challenge

True Grit

The City of Havre Wastewater Treatment Plant in Havre, Mont., was in search of a solution that would improve its screening process and specifically prevent sand and rags from passage. The old system often became plugged with rags, which increased the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) loading and removed organics that had to be reintroduced into the stream through extra treatment processes.

Challenge