Keys to Success

After you cross the 18-mile “Stretch” into the Florida Keys from the mainland, the world seems to turn at a happily slower pace.

By car, there is only one way to get there—a 127.5-mile, mostly two-lane road known as the Overseas Highway (U.S. 1). It travels along a patchwork of land and sea featuring 42 bridges, including the Seven Mile Bridge atop portions of the former Overseas Railroad.

Machine to the Rescue

Sometimes, it is a race against the clock to help customers avert a potential disaster. When time is limited and the needs are great, reliable pipe and fusion equipment, along with the dedicated manpower and expertise necessary to install it, can save the day. The perfect example is a university in Florida where medical buildings were nearly shut down because of a ruptured chilled-water pipe.

The problem

A Matter of Respect

At the beginning of the Civil War, Union soldiers occupied Arlington, Va., realizing that the location offered a great strategic location, just across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. When the Union started taking large amounts of casualties during the war, the Army quartermaster general ordered an examination of possible sites for military cemeteries.

Doubling Down with HDPE

Atlantic Street in Springfield, Mo., is notorious for water line breaks. It has been torn up more times than locals can count to make repairs on a 1925 cast-iron water main that is buried three to four feet underneath it. All kinds of weather—heat waves, cold snaps, droughts and downpours—can cause the ancient pipe to burst or rip at the joint under the patched street. A recent polar blast that lasted roughly a week resulted in more than a dozen water main breaks, and every one of them occurred on the area’s oldest cast-iron lines.

Rehab of the Realm

In the Victorian era, England underwent an amazing population boom. With more people came more need for services. During this time, large-scale water and sewer infrastructure were created throughout the country.

Growing Wiser

Boston—a town and small port in the county of Lincolnshire, England—nearly doubled its population from 2001 to 2011, and the explosive growth is expected to continue. Because of this, private water company Anglian Water is installing the infrastructure to support the future of the town.

The new source of water for Boston is 63 km away at Covenham Reservoir. The 200-acre reservoir is expected to provide 26 million L of water per day to Boston upon completion, while still being a supply feed for several other small towns and villages in the area.

The project

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