Water Industry Veteran Dies

Smith & Loveless Inc. announced the passing of Senior Engineering Consultant Frank G. Weis P.E., one of the nation’s longest tenured professional engineers. Weis, whose professional career began at Smith & Loveless Inc. nearly 60 years ago and lasted through 2014, died Jan. 19, 2014 at his home in Kansas City. He was 93.

Water & Wastewater Equipment Manufacturer’s Association Names New Vice Chairman

Frank J. Rebori, president of Smith and Loveless Inc., was named Vice Chairman of the Water and Wastewater Equipment Manufacturer's Association (WWEMA) at their 104th Annual Meeting last weekend in Las Vegas, Nev.

As Vice Chairman, his responsibilities include chairing the association’s strategic planning committee and overseeing its annual Washington Forum event.

California Pump Station Uses Pump Impeller to Prevent Clogs, Bolster Operations

Executives chose the X-PELLER from Smith & Loveless to mitigate blockage from cleaning wipesFor the residential community of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., durable cleaning wipes turned into a slow-building blockage, preventing its pump stations from operating at their full potential.

Smith and Loveless Release New Grit Removal Product

The PISTA WORKS provides complete screening and grit removal in one packageSmith & Loveless Inc. announced its latest headworks innovation, PISTA WORKS, offering a pre-engineered packaged headworks system combining screening, grit removal and grit washing in one integrated system.

Smith & Loveless Engineer Featured on Local News

Frank Weis honored for contributions to his communityKCTV 5 News, Kansas City’s local CBS affiliate, interviewed Frank Weis for its weekly “Faces of Kansas City” segment, which features prominent Kansas City residents who contribute to the community.

Smith & Loveless Responds to Flooding in Southeast U.S.

Company’s response team comes to victims’ aid in wake of May Tennessee and Kentucky floods The Smith & Loveless Response Team was on site and on call to help victims of the floods caused by the rise of the Cumberland River and other bodies of water in the Southeast on May 1 and 2, 2010. Extensive damage not only ruined homes and property, but it severely affected infrastructure relied upon daily by thousands of people to convey potable and wastewater.