Under the Sea

The Polarled Pipeline—a 482-km-long pipeline that will transport gas from the Aasta Hansteen field in the Norwegian Sea to western Norway—is the first pipeline to transport Norwegian Gas infrastructure across the Arctic Circle. Due to the large diameter and length of the pipeline, Halliburton needed a high capacity of seawater for flushing and maintenance (“pigging”) of the pipeline. The gas pipeline will be laid in water depths of up to 1265 m—this will be the first time a gas pipeline measuring 36 in. in diameter is being installed at such depths.

Inconvenient Fracks

Fracking typically uses between 1.2 and 3.5 million gal of water per well—large projects use up to 5 million gal. Sourcing these large amounts of water is a problem for the industry. Some companies truck water for use at a large expense; others use local close water sources—ponds, reservoirs, etc. Water transfer companies have used lay-flat hose or ring-lock pipe to transfer the water for short distances. Moving water more than a few miles has been an issue for the industry due to the cost and logistics of moving the equipment after a few fracking jobs.

Temporary Pumping System keeps Wastewater Treatment Plant Operating

Heavy rains last winter and spring in Arizona had been a welcome and much needed event, filling most lakes and reservoirs to capacity. However, even though Arizona needed the precipitation, it caused interesting challenges along the way.

Lift Station Upgrade - Maryland Environmental Services

Maryland Environmental Services (MES) operates lift stations for a correctional facility in Jessup, Maryland.

Bypass and Supplementary Pumping Systems Enable Rehabilitation

Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA) of Carrboro and Chapel Hill, North Carolina initially purchased a Godwin HL10M Dri-Prime pumpset and trailer for a bypass needed in its wastewater treatment facility during a clear well upgrade.

Lift Station Reliability - City of Hoover, Alabama

Sewage collection and treatment authorities across the nation are concerned with maintaining lift station pumping capacities during system failures. Sewage collection and treatment authorities across the nation are concerned with maintaining lift station pumping capacities during system failures. Traditional design has incorporated a diesel-powered generator to provide backup electricity in the event of a power failure at the station. Now, tradition is being broken as sewage authorities discover the benefits of backup pumping capacity instead of backup electrical capacity.

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